Fall concerns

Fall is great time to be outside with your dog.

Seasonal Concernspets-linda-saraco-nov-26

Fall in New England is a great time to be active outdoors with your dog.

Here are few seasonal safety concerns I keep in mind for fun throughout this season.

The days are shorter, and often it is quite dark by evening walk times.  Consider a reflective coat, collar, leash light, or a brightly colored vest for your dog.  It will make your dog stand out and be easier for others to see.  Bright orange and reflective coats are a good idea too if you and your dog spend time in areas where hunting takes place nearby.  Always check wild areas for postings indicating the type of hunting allowed and what time it is permitted.

Fall can be a drying time of year for your dog’s coat and the colder temperatures at night encourage us to turn on our heating systems and light up our fireplaces.  Brushing your dog frequently during this season will help to distribute the natural oils helping to keep your dog’s coat healthy and in its best condition.

When the weather is cooler wildlife becomes more active as it busily prepares winter.  This means that your dog may be more likely to have an encounter with a wild critter.  You may also find mice, bats, squirrels and others trying to move inside your warm home.  It’s hard to keep small rodents out.  If you, a friend or neighbor, choose to use traps or poisons your dog needs protection because their natural curiosity will cause them to explore new objects and smells.  Your dog can be hurt by mouse snap traps, rodenticides, or by chewing or eating a rodent that injected poison.  The catch and release type traps are the safest all-around option.

Be on the lookout for plants outside that produce fruits or berries in the fall.  A plant that was harmless may be poisonous now.  Also, your dog may have shown no interest in that particular plant until those berries or fruits show up.

In every season there is a holiday or special events such as a wedding, birthday occurring that has potential to upset your dog, requiring a little special preparation on your part to minimize stress levels your dog may experience.

Although this practice has rarely (ok, never) made me a favorite host I implement and, (well, I actually post) pet safety rules for both day and overnight guests.  Informing folks in advance is the only way to ensure my pet safety rules are known.  Pets can be overwhelmed by changes such as larger numbers of people at a party, kids, visiting animals, music, and outbursts. Your guest’s medications may end up in pet accessible areas. It may be helpful to designate a secure pet room that is off-limits to guest traffic. In case your pet escapes, risks are reduced if your pet is wearing ID tags.  It is a good idea to have a current picture and your animal control officer’s number on hand.

Every season can also hold an allergy stimulation.  As with people, dogs have indoor, outdoor, topical and internal allergic reactions.  Your veterinarian is your best resource for uncovering causes and determining treatment.

A regular InTune Groom session with your dog can help to clear stagnant energies and ITG Book Coverimprove circulation throughout the seasons.  Check out https://lindasaraco.com/intune-groom/ to learn more.

Before and after aura photos

Easy step to add in when brushing your dog.

The aura photograph on the left was taken of my dog Dominic and me before doing an InTune Groom (ITG) session.  The photo on the right was taken after a session.  The energy in the first photo is much more active than the energy in the second photo, which has a peaceful sense.

ITG is a unique combination of steps and techniques, which work in harmony to invite well-being and a stronger bond between you and your dog.  The steps and techniques all share these components.

  • sourced in age-old practices
  • influence the energetic systems in and around a dog’s body
  • vibrational remedies
  • influence health maintenance and well-being

Elements of ITG

  1. Traditional grooming tools and holistic products and bodywork
  2. Energetic enhancers and applying healing energy
  3. InTune Groom hand placements
  4. Color therapy
  5. Chakras
  6. Meridians

Why offer your animal friend an ITG?

Benefits of an InTune Groom 

  • builds and strengthens the relationship
  • eases transitional times
  • improves the sense of well-being
  • reaches to physical, mental and emotional levels
  • natural

ITG Book Cover

InTune Groom (ITG)
A guide to practical and magical canine care
developed by Linda Saraco
ITG Mission Statement
The InTune Groom mission is to provide a process to foster the building of deeper connections between animals and humans.  ITG promotes human animal bonding through enhanced routine coat grooming and general well-being improvement steps.

 

Shaving your dog

Shaving may not be a good idea

Shaving your dog in the summer may not be a good idea.

Trimming longer strands and removing mats will help your dog feel more comfortable in summer’s heat but close clipping or shaving may not be helpful.  Nature designed your dog’s coat in layers which provide them with relief from the heat and insulation from the cold.

Keep them cool by providing shade, plenty of water, and brush them more often.

3 Questions to Ask a Groomer

Looking for groomer?  Here are three questions you may want to ask.

  1. Are dogs hand or cage dried? If dogs are cage dried ask how they protect your dog from overheating in the kennel.  Are the cage drying systems timed to shut off automatically?
  2. Are they certified in Canine First Aid and CPR?
  3. How many dogs are groomed there each day and how many groomers are on staff?

Massage is not always beneficial

Massage is beneficial for many animals, but it is not recommended for all animals.

Caution      Massage is very different from petting your animal friend.  It is a highly intentional way of touching, and the objective is to achieve well-being and health benefits.   Massage is beneficial for many animals, however, massage is not always the right approach for every animal.  It can be harmful to animals with certain health conditions.  Always check with your veterinarian before beginning a massage program.

Benefits      Massage can be a wonderful heath-enhancer for animals  of all ages. For the older, it is excellent for soothing achy or stiff muscles while stimulating internal body functions. It helps with ease of movement, instills a sense of peacefulness, and helps towards restful sleep. What a special way to show our seniors that we care and appreciate their many years of friendship.

And, what about the most endearing creatures on earth – the baby animal companions? Touch is an essential element in a young animal’s life, and massage on a regular basis builds a strong bond between you and your animal friend. During growth time, young animals can experience joint and muscle stress as their bones are developing, and massage helps to ease the discomfort of growing pains.

Massage is a nurturing, preventative, natural approach, which may be safely added to some animal’s care regimen.

Massage benefits

  • Reduce anxiety and build trust
  • Improve blood and lymph circulation
  • Reduce tight muscles, spasms, and improve muscle tone
  • Speed healing time
  • Improve skin and coat
  • Increase flexibility, gait and movement
  • Refresh after traveling or crating
  • Aid the respiratory function
  • Improve energy
  • Lessen discomfort hip dysplasia and arthritis

Find a massage professional or learn massage      Ask your veterinarian or check the International Association of Animal Massage and Bodywork’s (IAAMB) site iaamb.org.  If you live near New England, the Bancroft School of Massage in Worcester trains students in small animal and equine massage, and they may be able to direct you to someone in your area.

Linda is a 2004 graduate of the Bancroft School of Small Animal Massage.

Brush your animal friend

Did you know you are doing your animal friend a great service just by brushing on a regular basis?

Brushing massages the skin and aids in circulation.  This action stimulates the release of sebum, which is natural oil that is beneficial to the coat.  Brushing distributes this natural oil on the coat lubricating and protecting the “hair” shaft.  Brushing the fur cleans the “hair” shaft, follicle and skin by removing trapped dirt and oils.  Regular brushing results in fur that is healthier, flexible, protected and has a shine.

Your dog’s skin plays an important role — it acts as a protection against the elements and helps to control body temperature.  Brushing improves the skin, prevents mats and tangles and allows a flow of air to reach the surface of the skin.  Brushing stimulates the lymph system and supports the immune system by helping to move waste and toxins.  Activity, such as playing and walking, also stimulate the lymph system.  The combination of high-quality diet, routine activity, and brushing will foster a shiny healthy coat.

Welcome!

I believe all animals we encounter help us and teach us. I post about animals, animal communication, grooming, and energetic modalities such as Integrated Energy Therapy® (IET®), InTune Groom and InTune ARC.

I work with both animals and humans.

If you only read one post here please make it the first one, At Face Value.  This is the story about the dog that saved my life.  Sharing his story is my way of thanking him.