Thank your dog

On Thanksgiving remember to thank your dog.

No surprise.  This is an article about how cool our dogs are.

Experts suggest that with every being we encounter we are unconsciously asking questions all the time.  The answers to our internal questions are typically not verbal.  They are answered by how we interpret another’s actions or inaction.

One of the reasons we love our animal friends so much is that they answer one of these vital self-assessment questions with a resounding, “Yes!” consistently.

Our internal question: Can I tell that I’m special to you by the way that you look at me?

Our unconditional love masters let us know they see us, they care, we are enough just the way we are, and we are special and wanted.

And here it is… dogs are so cool that way.tree-background

Fall concerns

Fall is great time to be outside with your dog.

Seasonal Concernspets-linda-saraco-nov-26

Fall in New England is a great time to be active outdoors with your dog.

Here are few seasonal safety concerns I keep in mind for fun throughout this season.

The days are shorter, and often it is quite dark by evening walk times.  Consider a reflective coat, collar, leash light, or a brightly colored vest for your dog.  It will make your dog stand out and be easier for others to see.  Bright orange and reflective coats are a good idea too if you and your dog spend time in areas where hunting takes place nearby.  Always check wild areas for postings indicating the type of hunting allowed and what time it is permitted.

Fall can be a drying time of year for your dog’s coat and the colder temperatures at night encourage us to turn on our heating systems and light up our fireplaces.  Brushing your dog frequently during this season will help to distribute the natural oils helping to keep your dog’s coat healthy and in its best condition.

When the weather is cooler wildlife becomes more active as it busily prepares winter.  This means that your dog may be more likely to have an encounter with a wild critter.  You may also find mice, bats, squirrels and others trying to move inside your warm home.  It’s hard to keep small rodents out.  If you, a friend or neighbor, choose to use traps or poisons your dog needs protection because their natural curiosity will cause them to explore new objects and smells.  Your dog can be hurt by mouse snap traps, rodenticides, or by chewing or eating a rodent that injected poison.  The catch and release type traps are the safest all-around option.

Be on the lookout for plants outside that produce fruits or berries in the fall.  A plant that was harmless may be poisonous now.  Also, your dog may have shown no interest in that particular plant until those berries or fruits show up.

In every season there is a holiday or special events such as a wedding, birthday occurring that has potential to upset your dog, requiring a little special preparation on your part to minimize stress levels your dog may experience.

Although this practice has rarely (ok, never) made me a favorite host I implement and, (well, I actually post) pet safety rules for both day and overnight guests.  Informing folks in advance is the only way to ensure my pet safety rules are known.  Pets can be overwhelmed by changes such as larger numbers of people at a party, kids, visiting animals, music, and outbursts. Your guest’s medications may end up in pet accessible areas. It may be helpful to designate a secure pet room that is off-limits to guest traffic. In case your pet escapes, risks are reduced if your pet is wearing ID tags.  It is a good idea to have a current picture and your animal control officer’s number on hand.

Every season can also hold an allergy stimulation.  As with people, dogs have indoor, outdoor, topical and internal allergic reactions.  Your veterinarian is your best resource for uncovering causes and determining treatment.

A regular InTune Groom session with your dog can help to clear stagnant energies and ITG Book Coverimprove circulation throughout the seasons.  Check out https://lindasaraco.com/intune-groom/ to learn more.

More Daisy Bravery

She was brave for them.

She was scared until it was time to be brave!

This morning as I was starting my day and wondering about the tropical storm approaching this area, a really cool memory of my dog Daisy came to me, and I found myself grinning.

Daisy was a peculiar dog. She was scared of many everyday things, but she was always surprising and incredibly brave when she was needed. She was the fiercest when you expected her to cower. Fear and danger seem to draw her out of her comfort zones.

This memory is of a family Fourth of July cookout.  A thunderstorm had started and was trying its best to ruin the cookout, and all the dogs gathered around Daisy because they were scared.  If memory serves me right, there were about 6 dogs; some of the dogs were older, both males and females and some were just puppies.

Daisy instinctively took charge and secured them up against the basement cement wall, and with her back to them she faced out towards the storm.  The other dogs were all shaking and scared, but not Daisy. She stood forward gallantly knowing the other dogs were depending on her to be the strong one and the rock they needed and she was set to be that. She stood there brazen, leaving her everyday fear for some other time.

At home, she would have been shivering in my lap because of a thunderstorm. It was cool to see her doing what she had done for the fact that she shook all the way to the outing that day because she was afraid of the car ride and leaving home. For these scared dogs, however, she stepped up; organized them by the wall, and they all felt safe behind her.

She stirred something in me that day. The way she cast her fear down and put the security and assurance of the other dogs before her own fear taught me a lesson of selflessness and responsibility. I would never forget watching her do this.

How Daisy came to be my pup

I met her early one morning.  I had stopped by the shelter to drop off a donation knowing that if I went during regular business hours, I’d be too tempted to look around at the pups. I know them to be my weakness, and I was not trying to adopt any more puppies as I had already adopted two dogs; Danny and Dominic from the same shelter.

To avoid temptation, I planned on dropping a check in the mail slot right in front of the door. As I did, my eyes fell on a box of puppies, obviously abandoned. Daisy and her other 3 littermates were dirty and covered in poo indicating that they had been in the box for some time.  I saw her and fell in love. I found myself waiting for the shelter to open and adopted her. She became mine the instant I saw her.

By the way – her full name was Daisy Ann Marie Pearl Saraco – by that’s another story.

An Act of Valor

Smallest dog saves the family

A dog is a man’s best friend. Ask yourself the question: Would a best friend risk their own life to save yours? In Daisy’s case, the answer would be yes.

All five of my dogs started barking wildly.  I rushed out to them immediately, feeling an unease that became very real as my eyes landed on a coyote up on the stone wall above my backyard. He had fierce eyes, bared teeth, and was prepared to attack my dogs who were barking loudly in defense. I yelled to my dogs, but the coyote’s eyes were fixated on their every movement and they were fixated on it too that my commands dissolved in the tense atmosphere.  The message was clear, however. The coyote intended to take one of my dogs and as my brain started to think of solutions; another thing became clearer – my only choice was to pull whomever I could get to safety.

I had nothing to ward off the coyote with, neither did I have a defense tool save for a garden shovel beside me.  I grabbed it and rushed towards the unfolding scene.  There was no time to think. A hungry coyote is a horrifying creature. My dogs were all facing upward at the coyote, and the coyote was bearing down on them from the wall. Senselessly, I threw the shovel at the coyote, but he did not budge. Instead, he gritted his teeth more fiercely at my dogs, apparently vexed and more determined. Using their collars, I pulled away two of my dogs that were closest to me.

I felt so powerless because I did not know whom else I could I get to safety and I felt like I was condemning the other three to death, but they were in the coyote’s sights. My heart bled in pain for the fates of Bow, Daisy, and Indy.

I approached the scene again, thinking of what next to do when Daisy did something I did not understand, a move that would likely cost her her life. Daisy moved away from the others and stood in the middle of the yard just beyond the stairs leaving herself alone and more vulnerable. She was the smallest of all the dogs, an easier prey for that coyote. The coyote saw her alone and focused all his attention on her.  Her move allowed me to get the other two dogs in hand, and I dragged them to a safe spot with a sickening knowledge that it would be Daisy that would be lost to that coyote. To this day, I can see all the details of that moment.  Daisy was standing there on her own; her back legs were quivering. Otherwise, she was frozen on the spot she stood. I thought fear caused her to freeze, but I was wrong.  She was quivering with adrenaline and thinking strategically.

With the speed of lightning, Daisy switched from frozen mode to high-speed. She bolted for the safe spot and as she did the coyote lunged after her. With one last leap, she made it to safety. We were all safe, and the coyote went away after circling outside for what seemed like forever.

There is no doubt that she knowingly created that distraction, risking her own life, helping to save the others. She stepped up when she could have cowered in fear. My brave girl! Daisy amazed me time after time throughout our 14 years together.

I know my actions were reckless that day, but instinct drove me – instincts to save the ones I love regardless of the cost to me.  Daisy and I were unintentionally communicating that day, both of us taking risks for our loved ones.  I did not know it at the time but she was working with me, reading my thoughts and body language.

Daisy is my helper animal.  Sometimes during an animal communication session, she joins in and improves the reading by adding clarity to that animals messages.

As Mark Twain aptly quoted,

“It is not the size of the dog in the fight; it’s the size of the fight in the dog.”

Daisy: the smallest, the cleverest and the bravest of all.

A Better Today

What’s really cool is that I’m working with animals all over the world because IARC is energetic!

It’s official – the case studies are complete, course development is underway, and the program has been expanded.   Final logo INTUNE ARC IARC

I am excited to let you know the program name is – Intune ARC (IARC).

As a reminder – This 6-week program is for an animal that is troubled by his or her past.  LEARN MORE.

Since spring, I have been working on new case studies for the courses.  The case studies include dogs, cats, horses, and birds.

As usual, the animals are always teaching us.  Although I had been offering this type of service for years, I learned a new way to help animals. In addition to Reiki and animal communication; the program now includes Integrated Energy Therapy (IET).  IET is working with angel energy to release discordant energy and infuse replacement supportive energies and messages.

What’s really cool is that it is energetic so I am working with animals all over the world.

pets-linda-saraco-nov-26

 

 

Before and after aura photos

Easy step to add in when brushing your dog.

The aura photograph on the left was taken of my dog Dominic and me before doing an InTune Groom (ITG) session.  The photo on the right was taken after a session.  The energy in the first photo is much more active than the energy in the second photo, which has a peaceful sense.

ITG is a unique combination of steps and techniques, which work in harmony to invite well-being and a stronger bond between you and your dog.  The steps and techniques all share these components.

  • sourced in age-old practices
  • influence the energetic systems in and around a dog’s body
  • vibrational remedies
  • influence health maintenance and well-being

Elements of ITG

  1. Traditional grooming tools and holistic products and bodywork
  2. Energetic enhancers and applying healing energy
  3. InTune Groom hand placements
  4. Color therapy
  5. Chakras
  6. Meridians

Why offer your animal friend an ITG?

Benefits of an InTune Groom 

  • builds and strengthens the relationship
  • eases transitional times
  • improves the sense of well-being
  • reaches to physical, mental and emotional levels
  • natural

ITG Book Cover

InTune Groom (ITG)
A guide to practical and magical canine care
developed by Linda Saraco
ITG Mission Statement
The InTune Groom mission is to provide a process to foster the building of deeper connections between animals and humans.  ITG promotes human animal bonding through enhanced routine coat grooming and general well-being improvement steps.

 

Shaving your dog

Shaving may not be a good idea

Shaving your dog in the summer may not be a good idea.

Trimming longer strands and removing mats will help your dog feel more comfortable in summer’s heat but close clipping or shaving may not be helpful.  Nature designed your dog’s coat in layers which provide them with relief from the heat and insulation from the cold.

Keep them cool by providing shade, plenty of water, and brush them more often.

Heartbroken Princess

She said, “I’m heartbroken.”

A woman invited me to her home to meet with her Boston Terrier, a sweet girl named Princess.  Princess was not herself lately, she seemed worried and down.  Princess eagerly told me how she felt.

She said, “I’m heartbroken.”

Her emotion filled message brought me to my knees. I scoop her up and held her while she explained her situation at home.  She explained that family has left and she does not know why they do not come back.

As it turns out there had been a lot of family changes that year.  First, her long time cat companion crossed over.  Then her people divorced.  Lastly four more family members who were temporarily staying with her moved.  This left Princess without that couple, their child and cat. The child was two-years old, and one of the parents was at home with him all day. Princess’ life was full and busy.  She became attached to the child, and she and the cat had become best friends.

As a result of her reading the woman decided to make some changes to help Princess feel better.  One change was her decision to share custody of Princess with her former husband who was happy to participate in the plan as he missed Princess.  Her former husband works from home.  Now Princess would again have his company all day while the woman was away at work.  Additionally, the woman found ways to spend more quality time with Princess on the weekend.

Client has given permission to share her story.  I do not share stories without explicit permission.

Give Your Pet the Gift of Safety

pets-linda-saraco-nov-26Holiday decorations and celebrations can be hazardous to your pets. To make sure holidays are safe and fun, please keep these tips in mind.

Guests – Advocate for your pet’s safety during the holidays for both day and overnight guests who may not be pet-familiar by informing them in advance and implementing pet safety rules, for example, about what not to feed them and behaviors that put them at risk. Pets can be overwhelmed by changes such as larger numbers of people at parties, kids, visiting animals, music and outbursts. Your guest’s medications may end up in pet accessible areas. It may be helpful to designate a secure pet room that is off-limits to guest traffic. In case of an escape, risks are reduced if pets are wearing ID tags.  It is a good idea to have a current picture and your animal control officer’s number on hand.

Tree – Rambunctious pets will naturally run around or climb them. To prevent a heavy tree from toppling onto your pet it is a good idea to attach your tree securely to the wall in multiple locations and test for stability. Vacuuming the tree area frequently will eliminate pine needles, which are dangerous to the digestive system. Securely cover the tree’s water container as many precut trees are treated with additives and preservatives that can leach into the water container. The ASPCA poison control hotline phone number is: (888) 426-4435.

Decorations – Sharp and breakable ornaments can cause injury to paws and mouths. Candles can burn and scented items can irritate sensitive respiratory and olfactory systems (especially birds). Tinsel, ribbon, yarn and wire ornament hooks can be fatal if ingested. Prompt removal of gift wrapping materials from pet accessible areas helps reduce risks. It is best to know the location of the closest 24-hour veterinary service.

Cords – These attractively chewable and tasty objects are a hazard to curious kittens and puppies. Make sure that electrical cords are in good condition and out of reach.

Pets as gifts – Surprise gift pets are often later unwanted and windup at shelters and/or euthanized. Planning and recipient preparation helps avoid this risk.

Reflection on your pet’s safety – With your pet clearly in your mind and the planned holiday activities, take a look at your home from his or her perspective. Travel through your home looking at each space through your pet’s eyes. What can you reach? What do you see? What do you smell? What do you hear? What may be dangerous?

May your holidays be the best ever with your friends, family and dear pets.

The dog version of Ted

His sadness instantly changed to outright laughter.

In his reading, Dave’s dog Rocky came across as a stereotype version of a “guy”.  The foul-mouthed, hooligan teddy bear that was in the movie Ted, with Mark Wahlberg, is a good example of Rocky’s personality.

Dave was a bachelor for most of the time that he and Rocky lived together.  The two hung out, watched sports, ran, roughhoused, and they loved each other.  Actually, Dave said Rocky taught him about real love, unconditional love.  Later, but while Rocky was alive, Dave married and had children.   Rocky became a family dog for the last five years of his life.

Rocky crossed over last year, and the family adopted a new dog.  Dave described his new dog as “a nice family dog and good with the kids.”

Dave missed his buddy Rocky, so he contacted me and we check in on him.  Rocky’s answer to Dave’s question instantly turned Dave’s sadness to outright laughter, and his mind flooded with fun memories of Rocky.

Dave asked Rocky what he thought about the new family dog.   Rocky said, “They should have just got a turtle!”

Dave laughed so hard he cried, then he said, “That’s my Rocky, all right!  Our new dog, Sable,  is nice, quiet and downright boring.”

 

Turtle lovers please accept my apology.  This is not my opinion of turtles.  I love turtles; I am just the messenger.